Saturday, March 7, 2015

Irish Tea & St Patrick History




Friends, I have much to share in this post, so grab a cuppa and sit with me for awhile. I hope you enjoy it and find a little something you did not know (-smile).

My Irish roots can be traced back to the McGuires - 1700, Ireland. But, even more fun for a tea lover like "me-self" is my relative Melba Teagarden, born 1717 in Dublin Ireland. Isn't that name just awesome-sauce?!

Yesterday, I decorated my wee kitchen shelf for March.


You may recall the lovely towel in pale green, dark green and ivory laces, I received as a gift. The candle is cinnamon vanilla from Gold Canyon in a lovely spun honey gold. It smells wonderful!

I thought this sweet little teapot on the lower shelf represented a darling Irish cottage. It was a gift many years ago from my former mother-in-law. Research found it to be the Village Collectibles 'Spring Cottage' teapot by artist Annie Rowe, manufactured in the Philippines.

This set features green and gold, perfect for St. Patrick's Day! It is Lorento by Noritake China, Japan. A 3-piece set was given to me and one to my sister when my grandmother passed away. I love how much detail is INSIDE the cup!

This pretty green plate has little pops of color. I think I bought it at a yard sale.

This sage green personal pot is from a company from my own state of CA! It has a comfortable handle and the shape reminds me of a Brown Betty.


I popped into Cost Plus World Market to pick up some Irish Breakfast Tea yesterday. I love how the box front and back allow you to decide if you will display the box horizontal or vertical. 

I also found this clover shaped Irish Shortbread!

A flip of the box indicates; YES, it really is made in Ireland along with a little history!


Now, for something really fun! After decorating my shelf, I walked next door to my neighbor's yard sale and can you believe it (?!), I found this sister teapot, 'Summer Cottage', on the left for sale for...drum roll please... ONE dollar! Despite a few chips, and lots of dirt inside, I naturally bought it. I cleaned it out with soapy water and bleach spray & it came out just lovely.

This morning I sampled the Irish Breakfast tea - complete with local honey (-you know how I love that) and a splash of milk. It has been a long time since I had it, and it is quite robust! I enjoyed it in my Dogwood flower teacup by Duchess bone china, England.

This sweet little spoon is such a favorite. It is so frilly and fine it makes me smile every time I use it. The back shows it is from Norway!

I have certain frames I have purchased just to feature random holiday art (especially vintage!).
I bought this one last month at a yard sale, and found a cute print on the net. It says:
May luck be your companion
May friends stand by our side
May history remind us all
of Ireland's faith and pride
May God bless us with happiness
May love and faith abide.

4.5" x 6.5" Art Card

I am creating a few of these little art cards to send to friends. They feature the #17 for St. Patrick's Day and a fun poem from Helen Steiner Rice

Long ago, St. Patrick taught the Irish about God

By showing them a shamrock 

he picked from Erin's sod.
He used the shamrock's leaves to symbolize 
the Three in One
The Holy Ghost, The Father, and His Son.
St. Patrick changed the hearts and lives of all the Irish race, And through the years, in all our hearts, he holds a special place.

Friends, it is so important to me that we understand where holidays like this come from.  Today they have been polluted into something about drinking and partying, but if you care to learn it, here is the true history.

The Life of Saint Patrick William J. Federer
He was born in 389 A.D., during the time of the Roman Empire's decay: immigrants flooded the borders; the national language of Latin was displaced; the underfunded military stretched across the world; rampant sexual immorality existed; and city centers were abandoned. Additionally, unbearable taxes, a burgeoning national debt and welfare rolls, and an excessive amount of government jobs plagued the Empire. Patrick’s home was the coastal town of Bonavern, Taberniae, Britain. His father, Calpurnius, was a civil magistrate and a deacon, and his grandfather was a minister in the Celtic Christian Church, whose origins date from second-century Roman occupation. At age 16, Patrick was kidnapped by raiders and sold as a slave in Ireland. For six years he herded pigs on a Slemish farm. Repulsed by the Druid's human sacrifice, magic spells, and superstitions, from which Halloween originated, Patrick committed himself to Christ, as he later wrote: "The Lord opened the understanding of my unbelief, that, late as it was, I might remember my faults and turn to the Lord my God with all my heart; and He had regard to my low estate, and pitied my youth and ignorance, and kept guard over me even before I knew Him." Patrick's life became marked by intense prayer. He described an "inner monition" which he recognized as the Holy Spirit. He was led to escape to the seacoast, where he found a ship to freedom. As they left Ireland, a storm blew them to Gaul (France), where he lived in a monastery on the island of St. Honorat for several months. Years later, Patrick had a dream, as he wrote in his Confessions: "In the depth of the night, I saw a man named Victoricus coming as if from Ireland, with innumerable letters; and he gave me one of these, and ... [that] moment I heard the voice of those who were beside the wood of Focluth, near the western sea; and this is what they called out: 'Please, holy boy, come and walk among us again.' Their cry pierced to my very heart, and I could read no more; and so I awoke." Patrick left his family and prepared for the ministry in Auzerre, Gaul. At age 40 he was permitted to go. In the year 432, the same time Attila the Hun was pillaging Europe, Patrick crossed the icy sea to Ireland with twelve brave monks. They made their way to the home of his old master, but found he died in a battle with a neighboring tribe. Undoubtedly, had Patrick not escaped, he would have been killed as well. They then went to the hall of Chieftain Loigaire, who was feasting with his warriors and Druid priests. A messenger ran in, interrupting the festivities, and announced the arrival of these unarmed strangers. As they entered the long, smoky hall, carrying a tall cross, silence fell. The Druid priests were threatened and alarmed when Patrick boldly spoke in their own language, which he had learned while a slave. The chieftain was astonished, and not only granted them religious toleration, but was baptized and donated the land for their first wooden church. Druid opposition grew fierce, and twelve times Patrick faced life-threatening situations, including a harrowing kidnapping and a two-week captivity. Patrick demonstrated that God's power is greater than Druid magic, resulting in many chieftains being converted. Feeling inadequate due to his lack of education, Patrick used illustrations to preach, the most famous of which was the three-leaf clover, which he used to explain the Trinity. Wherever he went, Patrick left ministers. He founded 300 churches, baptizing over 120,000 converts. It was said that Patrick found Ireland heathen and left it Christian, resulting in Irish missionaries re-evangelizing Europe in later centuries. Patrick wrote in his Confessions: "I pray those who believe and fear God, whosoever has deigned to scan or accepts this document, composed in Ireland by Patrick the sinner, an unlearned man to be sure, that none should ever say that it was my ignorance that accomplished any small thing ... but let it be most truly believed, that it was the gift of God. And this is my confession before I die."
Patrick died on March 17, 461. To have leaders like him today
 would be a pot-of-gold at the end of the rainbow.
William J. Federer is a nationally known speaker and best-selling author on America's heritage. Bill has published articles in newspapers, newsletters, booklets, on the Internet, as well as being interviewed for audio and video documentaries. He has been on hundreds of radio and television programs across America. His literary contributions include: America's God & Country Encyclopedia of Quotations, A Treasury of Presidential Quotations, American Quotations,  America's God & Country Inspirational Calendar, and 365 Presidential Quotations - A Day-To-Day Calendar. Bill and Sue, who live in the south St. Louis area with their four children, Jessica, Will, Melody & Michael, are available for interviews and speaking engagements. For more information, visit Bill's Web site: Amerisearch.net (copied from: Crosswalk.com)

Reaching across the miles to share my heart.
-Heather Elizabeth












25 comments:

  1. Top O' the mornin' to ya! Okay, I know it's not morning yet, but I couldn't resist :) I thoroughly enjoyed your post, sweet friend, and would love to have a cup of Irish tea with you. Your shelf looks so pretty with the soft green colors.

    I hope you had a nice weekend and may you have a blessed Sunday! Hugs to you!

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  2. Love all your green things for the season! My favorite is your Dogwood teacup and saucer; just beautiful! Irish and English Breakfast are my morning regulars. I love Irish Breakfast's robust nature, but yes, if you haven't had it in a while, it's potent! :) I'll have a picture of my own tea shelf up on my blog tomorrow. Please do stop by! :) http://golightlyplace.blogspot.com.

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    1. Hi Nicole,
      Nice to meet you :) I stopped by your blog and now I am curious to look into the book you reviewed -I'll Be Seeing You. Have a blessed day!!!
      Hugs & A Cup of Tea,
      Heather

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  3. Love the Dogwood tea cup and all the green. I haven't tried any Irish Tea yet, I may have to buy some and give it a try. I've been told that I have Irish blood in me.

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    1. Hi Sylvia. Funny thing is that it is made by Twinings of London, so I would be surprised if the Irish even drink it! -smile.

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  4. What a perfect Irish shelf display! Love it! On a sad note though, Herman Dodge is no more...closed about 2004 if I remember correctly, and is sorely missed. I love the Irish history and name of your Irish relative...Teagarden...perfect! Thanks so much for linking to Tuesday Cuppa Tea!
    Ruth

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    1. Thanks for stopping by Ruth. I had no idea about Herman Dodge. I have a lovely yellow pot as well I will put up next month hopefully in time for Daffodil Sunday which happens to be Easter Sunday this year! :) Yes, Teagarden...love love love that... in fact, I was divorced a couple of years ago and kept my married name for the sake of the kids, but I am SERIOUSLY thinking of changing it to this...particularly since I am not Spanish and my married name was/is :(
      Blessings,
      Heather

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  5. Perfect vignette for St Patrick's Day. We are Teapot 'sisters' . I have the Spring Cottage Teapot. I am thankful to learn that there are others in the set. How fun! Happy Tea Day!

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    1. Hi Susan,
      We are cottage sisters ;) Maybe you can find more on eBay, etc.
      Blessings,
      heather

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  6. Great post. I really enjoyed all your green items.

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  7. What a lovely Irish tea setting! I love hunting for tea treasures at yard sales. Your sister cottage teapots were clearly meant to be reunited!

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  8. Beautiful spoon and the Wedgwood is soooo beautiful! Perfect for St. Patrick's Day!

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  9. What an informative posting with interesting facts about St. Patrick's Day. I love your little cottage teapot! I have several and favor them.

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    1. Hi Bernideen,
      So glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for reading my very long post! ;)

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  10. I really enjoyed your posting, Heather. Your tea vignette is very charming and I do love the green. The cottage teapots are darling as well as the sage green one. The other pieces are wonderful too. I think Patrick would be appalled at how the holiday named in his honour has turned into such a "partying day." Very interesting post and thank you for sharing it with us and joining me for tea.

    Blessings,
    Sandi

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    1. Hi Sandi,
      Yes, I agree. Very sad, but thankful to have the history to refer to and prayerfully reflect on! Thank YOU for hosting :)

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  11. What a lovely post, both visually and in spirit! I always enjoy being reminded of the true meaning of St. Patrick's Day, and I also enjoyed seeing the beautiful vignette you created. Can't believe you simply went next door and found that matching teapot!

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  12. Hello, lovely lady! I'm so glad you shared this post with Roses of Inspiration. Enjoy your evening, my friend. Hugs!

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  13. Thank you for visiting Thistle Cove Farm; your post is delightful! Last year I told the story of Saint Patrick, this year only his prayer. I'm a firm believer in keeping the true stories and history alive; Christians today, at least in the USA as of now, haven't been persecuted as of old nor of other countries. When we keep alive "that great cloud of witnesses" we do service to them, to each other and, ultimately, to God.
    God's blessings on you, yours and the work of your hands and heart.
    Sandra at Thistle Cove Farm

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  14. What a lovely post and set of green treasures for St. Patrick's Day. I also love green China, it is so calming. I also enjoyed the story of the life of St. Patrick, how inspiring. Thank you for sharing!

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  15. So nice to share the meaning of St Patrick's day. Your dogwood teacup is just lovely - enjoy sipping tea!

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  16. Love your Saint Patrick's blog...love the tea, teapots and teacups too! It's so sad Herman Dodge closed in 2009...a loss indeed! Glad you posted this post in ATAA or I would have missed it!
    Ruth

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